Daily Management Review

Nissan sued South Korea


06/27/2016


The Japanese company Nissan filed a lawsuit against the Ministry of Environment of South Korea. According to the company’s representatives, the authorities has wrongly accused Nissan of cheating and understating the actual emissions of harmful substances. Earlier, the Ministry demanded from Nissan to recall more than 800 models Nissan Qashqai sold in South Korea, and pay a fine of $ 290 thousand.



Rian Castillo via flickr
Rian Castillo via flickr
The lawsuit was filed by a Nissan South Korean representative at the end of last week. Today, the company added that the claim will be considered by the Seoul Court of Administrative Affairs. The company’s spokesman told Reuters that "the suit is designed to challenge charges of the Ministry (Ministry of Environment of South Korea.)

In May, the Ministry blamed Nissan that its diesel versions of Qashqai had installed equipment, underestimate the real level of harmful emissions during the inspections. The Ministry has made this conclusion on the basis of more than 20 tests conducted after the scandal with Volkswagen, which came out with deception and understating emissions. As a result of the Volkswagen scandal, South Korean authorities have decided to conduct an audit of more than 20 of the most popular diesel models on sale in the country now. 

The audit ministry said that Nissan must recall more than 800 Qashqai diesels sold in the country, and pay a fine of 340 million won (about $ 290 thousand). The ministry has also filed an application to the prosecutor against Nissan Korea and its president Takehiko Kikuchi, accusing him of violating Korean laws on environmental protection. "We believe all of our actions are right," - the Ministry responded to the lawsuit filed by Nissan, which has already paid the fine.

Meanwhile, Volkswagen company will pay monetary compensation from one to seven thousand dollars to the American owners of cars – the Dieselgate victims.

Compensation, which still must be approved by the US government, will come to 482 thousand car owners with two-liter engines. The payment amount will depend on the car’s age and other factors that have not yet been disclosed.

Earlier, the German carmaker said that it has sent more than $ 10 billion to eliminate consequences of the scandal. However, it is not known what proportion of this sum will be spent on compensation for owners of vehicles with two- and three-liter diesel engines, on fines from US regulators, and on potential lawsuits.

Recall that on September 18, 2015, the US government accused the Volkswagen Group in installing fraudster software in the cars they produced. The feature allowed the car to bypass the rules on emissions to the environment adopted in the United States, which has led to a serious scandal against the automaker. Volkswagen began revocable campaign for three-liter diesel engines in the United States and two-liter diesel engines in Europe.  

source: wsj.com






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