Daily Management Review

Debates over Google are heating as a new EU directive is about to be introduced


04/23/2018


A month before the entry into force of the new European General Regulation on Data Protection (GDPR), which should strengthen and unify the protection of personal data of EU citizens, the public debate on how market participants are going to pass to new rules has significantly intensified in the media. The Internet giant Google, which had previously been criticized by EU authorities and publishers, said it wants to require Internet publishers to take additional steps to obtain consent from users to the processing of their data in order to protect themselves from possible claims by European authorities. This intention caused heated criticism from the publishers themselves.



mjmonty via flickr
mjmonty via flickr
The main reason for the adoption of the new European Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) is the promulgation of the Data Protection Directive of 1995 for all foreign companies that work with the personal data of EU citizens and better protection of personal data, taking into account the development of targeted Internet advertising. Since the new provision, adopted in April 2016, comes into effect already in May this year, the debate between market participants has significantly intensified in European and American media.

In late March, Google made it clear that, within the new rules, the company wants to recommend to Internet publishers to ask users for consent to process their personal data, including those that fall into Google's systems through reprints, direct links, contextual advertising, etc. American The Wall Street Journal first reported about it citing sources in the Internet company itself. Then the company confirmed it. Google explained that it "already now recommends its partners among publishers and advertisers using Google's advertising systems to obtain from users consent to the processing and use of their data, as already recommended by the current provisions of the EU."

At the same time, Google clarified that, taking into account the new provisions, it will develop a special "solution" for publishers and advertisers, which will meet all the conditions of the new provision. "This decision should support those publishers who want to show non-personalized ads. We work together with industry representatives, including the European branch of the Partnership for the Development of Interactive Advertising (IAB Europe)," the Internet corporation said, adding that "under the new laws, both European and international, all will be borne by our partners, and our customers, and our company. "

The intent of Google did not appeal to all publishers. Over the past week, representatives of several companies have appeared in the media criticizing the company's plans to require publishers to agree with users about the processing of their data.

source: wsj.com, ft.com






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