Daily Management Review

Facebook's first major investor Peter Thiel sells $ 4 million in Facebook shares


08/29/2019


Billionaire Peter Thiel, who became Facebook's first major investor 15 years ago, continues to reduce his stake in Mark Zuckerberg. In August, he sold Facebook shares for $ 4 million.



Dan Taylor
Dan Taylor
PayPal co-founder billionaire Peter Thiel has sold another portion of his stake on Facebook, Fortune writes citing the Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC). According to the materials, on August 22, Thiel sold about 22,000 securities at an average price of $ 182. The total amount of transactions amounted to $ 4 million.

After the transactions, the billionaire's direct and indirect ownership (through his Founder's Fund) left about 63,500 Class A Facebook shares. This is slightly more than 0.1% of his share (44.7 million shares) in 2012, when the company held IPO, Fortune notes. Thiel remains on Facebook's board of directors.

Peter Thiel, now included in Forbes' ranking of the most successful technology investors, was Facebook's first major investor. In 2004, Thiel provided Mark Zuckerberg, the founder of the social network, with his first capital of $ 500,000. At that time, Facebook existed for only a few months and was estimated at $ 4.9 million.

In 2012, during an IPO on the Nasdaq, Facebook was valued at more than $ 100 billion. After the lock-up period, Thiel sold almost 80% of his package at a price of about $ 20 per share, earning about $ 1 billion on investments in a social network. Subsequently, he continued reduce its stake, for example, in 2017, he sold three quarters of his stake for $ 28.7 million.

At the close of trading on August 27, the value of Facebook shares was $ 181.3, the company's capitalization exceeded $ 517 billion.

In early 2019, Forbes estimated Thiel’s fortune at $ 2.5 billion, placing him in 916th place in the ranking of the richest people in the world. Mark Zuckerberg took eighth place in this rating, his fortune was estimated at $ 62.3 billion.

source: forbes.com






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