Daily Management Review

Please, 'Cool It' With The North Korea Threats: China Beseeches The US


10/11/2017




Please, 'Cool It' With The North Korea Threats: China Beseeches The US
‘Calm down with the threats of violence against North Korea’ is the one message that China is willing to repeat it constantly in its media outlets and this message is aimed for the United States.
 
In a show of force amid high tensions over North Korea’s nuclear and missile programs, the U.S. military flew two Air Force B-1B Lancer bombers over the Korean Peninsula late on Tuesday.
 
A thinly veiled threat of a possible armed confrontation with North Korea was delivered on Saturday by the U.S. President Donald Trump and the move came after that threat.
 
In an editorial published on Tuesday in state mouthpiece People's Daily, China urged the two parties to "cool it," as heh country got right back to work after a week-long public holiday.
 
"War on the Korean Peninsula would be catastrophic, and dialogue remains the best option," the Communist Party-owned newspaper said.
 
"His threats seem to be part of a larger strategy, coherent or not, to instill fear in Pyongyang, so that it will agree to U.S. demands to abandon all nuclear weapons and existing nuclear programs," the paper added.
 
the Communist paper concluded that the strategy "could backfire bigly" even while it acknowledged that "there is logic behind Trump's threats" against North Korea.
 
It was just a day ago that the Chinese foreign ministry spokesperson Hua Chunving urged for calm in a press conference that the editorial also repeated the same views.
 
"The current situation on the Korean Peninsula remains highly complex and severe. We hope that various parties can strictly observe and implement the UN Security Council resolutions, refrain from provoking each other and aggravating the contradiction, exercise restraint and caution to ease the tension," Hua said.
 
Warning of a "fatal misjudgment" in an "extreme atmosphere", the nationalistic Global Times also weighed in.
 
"Washington and Pyongyang have been intensifying hostile and threatening rhetoric against each other for some time. Their frequent saber-rattling, unimaginable in the past, is escalating tensions in Northeast Asia," the paper said in an editorial on Tuesday.
 
It also proffered a suggestion to break the stalemate.
 
"The U.S. won't accept North Korea as a nuclear state, a stance shared by the international community. For North Korea, security is the top concern, which should be acknowledged by the U.S. The two sides can start seeking a breakthrough by Pyongyang giving up nuclear weapons for security," it said.
 
There has been a wider push for stability ahead of a pivotal Chinese Communist Party Congress that starts on October 18, and China's calls for calm on the Korean Peninsula come amid a wider push for that mega event – amongst the most important ones for the country in the last decade.
 
(Source:www.cnbc.com) 






Science & Technology

Wreck Of Russian Ship Rumoured To Have 5,500 Boxes Of Gold Found Near South Korean Island

Gene Editing of Human Embryo Could Find ‘Moral’ Grounds: UK’s Ethics Council

Baidu comes up with a self-driving bus

Developing countries are stepping up their own space programs

McAfee: Number of cybercrime attacks skyrocketed

RemoveDebris Mission To Clear Debris Of In Orbit Over Earth

British experts: Online gambling is dangerous

Vodafone Chooses ‘Highly Trafficked Urban’ Space As Its 5G Testing Grounds

Space To Become A Travel Destination By 2022

Dream Of Immortality Can Be Realised By 2045

World Politics

World & Politics

Ireland pledges to stop investing in fossil fuels

Germany asks to return € 4 thousand subsidies for the purchase of Tesla

Was Trump's visit to the UK the last straw?

Prime Minister May Could Alter Brexit Strategies, Said Ress-Mogg

Le Maire: The US refused to release France from anti-Iran sanctions

One Belt, One Road is facing difficulties around the world

Qatar to raise $ 4 billion to buy Eurofighter Typhoon jets

The UK sets to turn all cars zero-emission by 2030