Daily Management Review

PwC: Watchdogs are more frightening than hacker attacks


03/01/2018


Investors and investment analysts see the main danger for business growth in cyberthreats, while the heads of the same companies are more inclined to expect trouble from governments - in the form of excessive regulation and higher taxes, according to a global poll of investors conducted by PwC.



Colin
Colin
Both groups are optimistic about the short-term prospects of the global economy: 54% of investors expect growth during the year (45% a year earlier) and 57% of executives (29% in 2017). 42% of businessmen and 23% of investors believe that the positive conjuncture will have a positive impact on their companies’ revenue in the coming year. Confidence in the medium-term growth of investment income, on the contrary, fell: 45% of the heads of companies and 20% of investors expect it in the next three years against 51% and 31% in 2017. Proceeding from this, investors consider organic growth and cutting costs to be the best strategy. Both groups of respondents chosen the United States, China, Germany, Britain and India as the countries most influencing the growth of the global economy.

Compared to the previous year, all survey participants began to worry more about cybersecurity, geopolitical uncertainty and the speed of technological change. Yet, businessmen are much more concerned with excessive regulation by the state, rising taxes, terrorism and a lack of key skills. All respondents consider the need to demonstrate results in a more rigid time frame a key challenge for companies, but investors are much more concerned about the problems of trust. 48% of investors and 24% of managers noted growth of distrust in the relations of companies with governments, 43% and 19% with their own employees, 36% and 18% with consumers respectively. To build relationships within organizations, one should be more transparent about salaries and bonuses, investors believe. At that, increasing confidence in consumers will be prompted by investments in cybersecurity and openness to customers when storing and using their personal data. Investors also expect changes under the influence of technologies - artificial intelligence, robotics, blockchain - (85% vs. 64%), changes in consumer behavior (81% and 68%) and supply channels (76% and 60%).

source: pwc.com






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