Daily Management Review

Trash Comes To Redeem ‘Venezuela’s Vanishing Manufacturing Sector’


07/20/2018


Amid the economic turmoil, two young engineers fabricate difficult to obtain car parts out of trash.



At the time when the Venezuelan economy seems to collapse, two young engineers within their garage dumped with “broken electronic hardware” have discovered “an opportunity” as they melt waste plastic and use it to run through their 3D printer and create “intricate pieces” of car parts.
 
Thanks to the currency control system of Venezuela which has gone dysfunctional, these car parts created by these two engineers are becoming more and more “hard to obtain” as restrictions are affecting the “import of basic material”.
 
The engineers, named Albermar Dominguez and John Naizzir, generate “only a kilogram of plastic printing filament” daily with the aim of restoring the wealthy landscape of the country’s manufacturing market, as they show the way it turn the base material “cheaper for companies that depend on expensive imports”.
 
The “unprecedented crisis” led some of the young people to walk in the path of innovation during the five years of “economic contraction” which has been spurred from failed policies of the state besides the drop in the crude oil price seen worldwide. The twenty six year old Dominguez said:
“People don’t believe that technology is being developed in the country”.
 
In fact, the widespread medicine and food shortage have caused an exodus in Venezuela. As a result many students of University in Caracas also classmates of these talented engineers have followed the mass. While, Reuters informs that:
“Annual inflation has hit almost 50,000 percent and Caracas ranks as one of the world’s most dangerous cities”.
 
Dominguez went to the U.S. and gained knowledge on 3D printing technology as his interest drew him towards recycling waste. Upon returning to his country, he teamed up with Naizzir, a year older to him, rummaged their university “garbage dump” to collect “computer cases and old printers”. Soon afterwards, the company started by the duo, called Nedraki, got into an agreement with “recycling plant” in Valencia, Venezuelan for sourcing more materials.
 
At a time when the entire nation took to the streets protesting, these two young talents came up with their “first metre of plastic filament”. Presently, Nedraki is the supplier of plastic filaments to “13 Venezuelan firms”, while the company is also producing various plastic parts such as “transmission gear cogs for other companies”.
 
According to Dominguez, the filament thus produced brings down the cost by 40%, as the cost of “importing and transporting” are taken out of the manufacturing process. Nedraki has priced one kilogram of filament at “$17”.
 
Moreover, they are making attempts to convince “other Venezuelan companies” to turn to 3D printing technology:
“Despite the very challenging outlook, we receive a lot of support because people take hope from our project.”
 
 
 
References:
reuters.com







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