Daily Management Review

Workers Would Be Helped To Lift More By These Robotic Vests


11/13/2017




Workers Would Be Helped To Lift More By These Robotic Vests
Workers would now be able to lift heavier loads than ever – not because of gaining of personal strength but due to new robotic vest that would help them to do so. Such a vest has already been made by a U.S. based hi-tech company working form the state of California. The aim of the company is to assist workers in labor-intensive industries and job profiles, according to reports published in the local media. 
 
In the situations and cases where workers are engaged in heavy-load jobs, especially in factory settings and in construction sites, workers would be able to expend less energy and power with the use of the robotic vest that has been christened as Exoskeleton Vests and has been built by a company called Ekso Bionics which situated in the city of Richmond, in the eastern Bay Area north of San Francisco.
 
The He feeling that one would get by putting on an empty backpack which straps to the back and arms of an individual is how a reporter from local KPIX TV (Channel 5) described wearing an Exoskeleton in a video footage available to be seen.
 
13.5 kg of lifting force in each arm is reportedly added by the vest which helps the wearer to lift heavier weights. The news report further stated that a 30.6-kg piece of metal would be enable dot be lifted with just one finger in a zero-gravity situation with the vest.
 
Quoting a company manager, the news report further stated that jobs can be completed at least two to three times faster by workers wearing the vest.
 
The company claimed that the aim of the vest is to make it possible for humans to become "part robot" themselves, and it should not be in any way looked at as a robot that has been created to replace factory workers.
 
There is "no electricity going through this device at all, it's all physics", Claire Cunningham, user experience manager at Ekso Bionics was quoted as saying in the news report.
 
Workers in heavy lifting jobs also have a high chance of physical injuries as well as incurring neck and back pains and the vests have the potential to reduce such casualties and pains according to Cunningham.
 
The Ekso vests have already been tried out by workers at the U.S. car manufacturer Ford Motor Company where overhead tasks can be seen to be done by the workers wearing the vests in the assembly line of the factory.
 
The arms lifting rates by the workers at the Ford assembly line is about 4.600 times every day for a single worker that totals to about more than a million times a year.
 
The human strength, endurance, and mobility potential of humans and their current physical limitations would be helped to be rethought by the latest technology and engineering that is being developed by the company, according to the official website of Ekso Bionics.
 
(Source:www.xinhuanet.com) 






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Workers Would Be Helped To Lift More By These Robotic Vests

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