Daily Management Review

As Brexit Talks Resume, U.K. Seeks Progress On Citizens' Rights


07/17/2017




As Brexit Talks Resume, U.K. Seeks Progress On Citizens' Rights
During the second round of divorce talks starting Monday in Brussels, European Union negotiators have been urged by Brexit Secretary David Davis to push for progress on resolving thorny questions around the rights of citizens resident in each other’s nations.
 
“We made a good start last month, and this week we’ll be getting into the real substance,” Davis said in a statement released by his office. “Protecting the rights of all our citizens is the priority for me going into this round, and I’m clear that it’s something we must make real progress on.”
 
“It’s absolutely clear that businesses, where they have discretion over investment, where they can hold off, are doing so,” Chancellor of the Exchequer Philip Hammond said Sunday on BBC Television’s “Andrew Marr Show.” ”And you can understand why. They’re waiting for more clarity about what the future relationship with Europe will look like.”
 
After Brexit, what rights some 3.2 million EU citizens in Britain and another million Britons living in the EU will retain would be attempted to hammered out in the form of an agreement as envoys negotiate about the issue in Brussels through Thursday. A tepid receptio0n was given by her EU counterparts, who said they didn’t go far enough, to UK Prime Minister Theresa May’s proposals last month.
 
Sources have said that the meeting between Davis and the EU are being soured by the uncertain fate of the citizens and this is something that has warned May repeatedly about. But an unconditional pledge on their rights has been rejected by May.
 
Additionally, an Opinium survey that found 57 percent of people think May should resign before the next scheduled general election in 2022 and a Survation poll for the Mail on Sunday that put the opposition Labour Party two points ahead of May’s Tories, both published in the week end’s paper, have compounded the premier’s woes.
 
Rather than the few months suggested by Trade Secretary Liam Fox, Hammond said transitional arrangements for Britain leaving the European Union are likely to last a couple of years, and this contradiction have exposed more divisions.
 
“It depends how long we need to put in place new customs systems, new migration systems; these things can’t be magicked up overnight,” Hammond said. “We’re not going to be talking a couple of months, we are going to be talking a couple of years.”
 
“As long as we leave in March 2019, then I’m happy, as long as we’ve got a very time-limited transitional period to make it work for business,” said Fox during a TV interview evidently trying to downplay his differences with Hammond.
 
Brexit is not the only reason or the infighting. Hammond criticized by Johnson for the statement that he had made where he had described public-sector workers as “overpaid” during the cabinet meeting last week, The Sunday Times cited five unidentified sources as saying. The suggestion that the Treasury’s cap on public-sector pay should be eased has been made by Johnson among other ministers. Meanwhile, Saturday’s Sun newspaper reported that Hammond made a sexist comment about women driving trains.
 
“Some of the noise is generated by people who are not happy with the agenda that I have, over the last weeks, tried to advance of ensuring that we achieve a Brexit which is focused on protecting our economy,” Hammond said.
 
(Source:www.bloomberg.com) 






Science & Technology

Chinese Study Claims Heart Diseases Can Be Reduced By Having An Egg A Day

Asteroid mining: Reality or fiction?

3D Printing Used For Life Saving Kidney Transplant In Two Year Old At U.K. NHS

California to require solar panels for new homes by 2020

Blockchain Enables De Beers To Track Diamond From The Miner To The Retailer

Microsoft releases Windows 10’s April 2018 Update

DNA Sequencing Project Proposed For All Complex Life Forms On Earth By An Int’l Team

Facebook may start production of its own microprocessors

Long-Term Alcohol Monitoring Could Be Possible With A New Injectable Chip Developed By U.S. Researchers

Sweden Now Has The First Electrified Road In The World

World Politics

World & Politics

The British government is trying to unblock money to pay off the national debt

Ministerial Visit From India To North Korea Aimed At Strengthening Ties

What countries are the biggest losers of Trump’s Iran decision?

World's Oldest Elected Prime Minister Is Malaysia’s 92 Year Old Mahathir Mohamad

Why Is U.S. Pulling Out Of The Iran Deal A Big Deal For The World

Merkel, Macron, May call on Iran to adhere to the nuclear deal

Arab Region Driven In ‘Wrong Direction’ In Last 10 Years, Say Arab Your: Survey

German doctors demand a tax on sugar