Daily Management Review

Hackers stole data of 5 million bank cards


04/02/2018


Hackers managed to steal data of more than 5 million debit and credit cards that customers used to buy goods at American chain stores Lord & Taylor, Saks Fifth Avenue and Saks Off 5th. Despite the fact that the information about the incident appeared on April 1, it seems that the incident was not a joke.



zyphbear via flickr
zyphbear via flickr
Hackers from the Fin7 group, also known as JokerStash, stole credit card data from more than five million Americans. According to Gemini Advisory, information on 125 thousand cards is put up for sale; the remaining data can also be disclosed shortly. Earlier, the group hacked the customer base of chain stores Whole Foods, Chipotle, as well as Omni Hotels & Resorts and Trump Hotels.

Customers of Saks Fifth Avenue and Lord & Taylor stores, who made purchases from May 2017 to the present, were hit hard. Most of the victims live in the states of New York and New Jersey. 

Trading company Hudson's Bay Company (the oldest in the United States of America), owning these networks, confirmed the fact of hacking its system of non-cash payments. As it is specified, the problem with data security arose in certain stores in North America. The investigation has already been launched. There is no indication that the problem has affected the Hudson's Bay Company's Internet business, as well as its Hudson's Bay, HBC Europe and Home Outfitters platforms.

With the declared number of compromised payment cards, the current hacker attack is one of the biggest and most harmful for the retail industry, cyber security experts say.

Previously, US investigative agencies reported the theft of data of 130 million credit cards from 2006 to 2008 in Heartland Payment Systems, the operator of 7-Eleven and Hannaford Brothers stores. In 2013, criminals hacked Target Corp and stole data from 40 million cards, as well as 56 million from Home Depot in 2014.

The Hudson's Bay Company stressed that buyers will not be subjected to fraudulent withdrawal of money due to hacking. The company has already promised its customers free protection of personal data and recommended that they check the status of their bank accounts for unauthorized withdrawals.

source: nytimes.com






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