Daily Management Review

Hamburg becomes the first German city to ban old diesels


05/29/2018


In a couple of days, on May 31, the ban on diesel-powered cars will be introduced on two streets in the center of Hamburg. The innovation does not apply to all diesel vehicles of the second largest city in the city of Germany. Under the ban fall 214 thousand "diesels" of the standard Euro-5 or even older cars, i.e. about two-thirds of the entire diesel fleet in Hamburg. The German government hopes that other German cities will follow Hamburg's example aimed at combating air pollution.



The City Hall of Hamburg informs that the ban begins to operate after the Supreme Court of Germany passed a decision on its legality and the constitution's compliance. The old "diesels" will be banned from entering Stresemannstrasse, a 1.6 km long street, and the 600-meter stretch of the Max-Brauer-Allee. The ban does not apply to public buses and residents of these streets. The city authorities have already installed forbidden signs and showed ways to bypass closed highways. 

Naturally, the revolutionary idea of the city authorities has its opponents. They argue that it is half-hearted and that it will only lead to the fact that the air pollution in other parts of the city will become even higher. 

Hamburg is one of 80 German cities, where the level of nitrogen dioxide in the air regularly exceeds 40 micrograms per cubic meter of air allowable in Europe. Last week, the European Commission announced that it intends to file a lawsuit against Germany and several other European countries, which it accuses of inactivity in the fight for air purity.

Explaining the ban, the Senate of Hamburg recalled the so-called "Dieselgate", the scandal of 2015, when it became clear that Volkswagen had falsified the results of tests for harmful emissions. Thanks to special chips, diesel cars showed acceptable results for harmful emissions only during the tests. As soon as they traveled to the city streets, everything fell into place and they began to intensively poison the air.

source: theguardian.com






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