Daily Management Review

NASA and Uber are developing a flying taxi


11/09/2017


The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) of the United States and Uber Technologies Inc. on Wednesday signed an agreement on the joint development of a project of flying taxis on electric traction.



ell brown
ell brown
As Uber stated in a message, tests of a new model of movement around the city will begin in 2020. The first city in which the UberAir service will appear is Los Angeles. A little later, Dallas will join the race.

"Los Angeles is an exemplary city, very busy in terms of traffic, and in the foreseeable future there are no options to significantly ease the burden of public transport systems," said Jeff Holden, UBER's chief product manager.

By the summer Olympic Games in 2028, which will be held in Los Angeles, residents of the city will already be actively using flying taxis, he added.

The mayor of Los Angeles, Eric Garcetti, promised to support the project, noting that the city is "the ideal testing ground for the new technology," writes the Los Angeles Times.

The number of equipment suppliers and pilots for the project includes Embraer, Bell Helicopter, Pipistrel, Aurora Flight Sciences and Mooney Aviation. Uber, as in the case of land transportation, will be responsible an application that will allow the passenger to book trips.

It is assumed that UberAir will be an affordable option for daily travel between the city center and the suburbs, since the transition to electric motors will significantly reduce the cost of service compared to UberChopper helicopter transport.

Uber is going to use vertical takeoff and landing aircraft that will fly at low altitudes. Over time, the company plans to switch to drones, which will further reduce tariffs.

In partnership with NASA, the company will also develop a new unmanned air traffic control system.

Analysts note that obtaining from regulators may require more time than the company expects. Certification of commercial aircraft of The US Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) usually takes two years of testing and verification. In the case of an electric motor, it will also be necessary to verify the safety and reliability of the batteries. 

source: latimes.com






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