Daily Management Review

UK Joins Growing List Of Countries To Ground Boeing’s 737 MAX


03/13/2019




UK Joins Growing List Of Countries To Ground Boeing’s  737 MAX
The list of countries ordering the grounding of Boeing 737 MAX jets after the second fatal crash of the aircraft within about 5 months is growing. The latest to add itself to the list is the U.K. whose aviation regulators ordered all 737 MAX jets to be grounded. These events have been taking place since the crash of an Ethiopian Airlines 737 MAX 8 on Sunday.
 
A large number of countries - from China to Mexico, have ordered the temporary grounding of the planes.
 
"The UK Civil Aviation Authority has been closely monitoring the situation, however, as we do not currently have sufficient information from the flight data recorder we have, as a precautionary measure, issued instructions to stop any commercial passenger flights from any operator arriving, departing or overflying UK airspace," it said.
 
The UK authorities took the decision to ground the jets despite the US Federal Aviation Administration announcing a day earlier that the Boeing 737 MAX jets were completely airworthy and there was no reason to ban them from flying.
 
All of the 157 people on board an Ethiopian Airlines Boeing 737 MAX 8 died after it crashed soon after take off from Addis Ababa on Sunday. In October last year, the same jet model was involved in another crash – a plane of Indonesia’s Lion Air, crashed into the Java Sea. All 189 people on board were killed in the accident. 
 
The decision of the US FAA of not grounding the planes was noted and remarked upon by Boeing and the plane maker and the company had no immediate plans of issuing new guidance to pilots "based on the information currently available."
 
"We understand that regulatory agencies and customers have made decisions that they believe are most appropriate for their home markets," Boeing said. "We'll continue to engage with all of them to ensure they have all the information they need to have the confidence they need safely continue to operate their fleets or return them to service."
 
The accident and the grounding of the planes resulted in a 5 per cent drop in Boeing shares in morning trading.
 
Since the Lion Air crash, questions have been raised about the automated systems on the Boeing 737 MAX. On its part, Boeing has said that some software updates are being prepared by it for the 737 MAX and would be issued within weeks and would also bring in some changes in pilot training and manuals.
 
 "Airplanes are becoming far too complex to fly. Pilots are no longer needed, but rather computer scientists from MIT. I see it all the time in many products," tweeted President Donald Trump on Tuesday after the U.K. issued its order of grounding of the planes. "Always seeking to go one unnecessary step further, when often old and simpler is far better", he said in the tweet.
 
There were no comments available in the media from FAA. 
 
Worries about the Boeing 737 MAX have been expressed by air travelers and even some flight crews.  
 
(Source:www.cnbc.com)






Science & Technology

Tech giants face stricter government regulation in the US

Nestle's Head: Veggie meat is new megatrend

Huawei may introduce Android replacement in August

Are US high-tech investors causing brain drain in Europe?

'Russia's Google' Yandex Was Hacked By Western Intelligence For Spying: Reuters

Reuters: Chinese hackers were stealing data from IT giants for years

China's first solar power molten salt plant sets record

WSJ announces imminent start of Boeing 737 MAX flight tests

Study: Machine learning is five times more harmful for the environment than a car

Would Singapore Be The First One To Bring Lab Grown Shrimps To The Global Market?

World Politics

World & Politics

France announces new tax for air fares

Europe Concerned Over Iran Move To Breach Uranium Enrichment Cap

Singapore To Build ‘$296 Million’ Smart Next-Gen Army Training Centre

No More Sales Of E-Cigarettes In San Francisco?

US ‘Hell-Bent On Hostile Acts’ Even After Trump-Kim Agreement, Says North Korea

Italy avoids EU sanctions for high national debt

Trump allocates 4.6 bln to help migrants

Iran Says Trump’s Belief That US-Iran War Would Be Short Is “An Illusion”