Daily Management Review

Wear a Wristband, Know the Harmful Chemicals You are Exposed to


07/15/2015




Wear a Wristband, Know the Harmful Chemicals You are Exposed to
Technology is now wearable.  Smart watches, fitness trackers and augmented and virtual reality headsets have become the norm for the tech-crazy.

These gadgets collect and transfer data and conveying information.

How would one feel if a wearable gadget could warn you of the harmful chemicals that you face in everyday life? Given the context of global pollution and the ever rising concern for health and safety, the manufacturers of this gadget are of the view that a large section of health conscious and tech-savvy population would love to have such a gadget that they can carry with themselves and even be a fashion accessory.
 
In our daily lives we constantly get exposed to chemicals, be it in the pesticides in our food, the flame retardants or some other chemicals in our environment, whose presence we are not generally even aware of.
 
Now you can know all about chemicals around you by simply strapping on a wrist band. This is the concept behind the creation of MyExposome, a plastic Livestrong-like wrist band. However, this is not an ordinary fashion accessory. This high tech gadget would be able to identify and alert the wearer about any harmful chemicals in the surrounding. The gadget would absorb any chemical in the surrounding and would let the wearer to know the chemical that one is exposed to.

The company MyExposome, has patented the wristband and is the process of ‘kickstarting’ initiative to fund the project into commercialization. The company states that the wrist band would “mimic your exposure to chemicals”. The light-weight non-intrusive wristband would absorb the chemicals and the wristband would then be analysed to determine the chemicals that the wearer was exposed to.

The company claims that this testing and analysis is an integral part of this technology which would be able to determine many of the chemicals that a person wearing the wrist band was exposed to.
Company states that the results would take about a week to be delivered to the wearer but gives assurance about the accuracy of the analysis. One can then take necessary precautions about how to protect oneself from regular exposure to the chemicals found in the analysis.

Though the wristband would not be effective with respect to detecting chemicals in the food we eat, it would be able to absorb chemicals in case they are excreted by the pores on our skin.

For a start, the wrist band has a capacity to absorb more than 1400 different chemicals. However for the purpose of practicality, the company would narrow down the range during and after analysis of a used wrist band. To narrow done the huge list of absorbable chemicals, the company has initiated the ‘kickstart’ project so that various people wear the wrist band and the company is able to identify which chemicals are most important and delete or add chemicals to the list of 1400 chemicals that can be absorbed by the wrist band.  

The company is now planning on an aggressive social media campaign to convince users to donate $29 for every wrist band and to collect enough funds to make the tests economically viable.
 
(Source: http://techtimes.com & http://www.myexposome.com) 






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