Daily Management Review

AHA Customers In Iceland Enjoy The First ‘Drone Delivery Service’ In The World


08/27/2017


Learn the benefits of a new age technology while that could also herald other concerns think the experts.



In a “joint venture” of AHA, the “largest online marketplace” of Iceland, and Flytrex, “autonomous drone company”, the very first “drone delivery service” kick started in Iceland’s Reykjavik. The aim of the said service is to bring down the cost and “delivery times”.
 
It is the very first “drone delivery service” in the world that has come into operation. As a result, the in the capital of Iceland, consumers will have the option of receiving goods including food items’ delivery directly at their doorsteps “via an autonomous flying vehicle”. The providers are confident that this new service will “significantly speed up delivery times”.
 
The city situated on the coast has subdivision created by a “large bay” as well as “several smaller rivers”, whereby making transportation a cumbersome and “time-consuming” affair. The co-founder and the C.E.O. of Flytrex, Yariv Bash, the person behind the drone service launch, said:
“We're making delivery as instant as ordering”.
 
AHA customers can easily avail the new service, while the partnership behind the launch hopes to finally roll out the service in abroad. While, CNBC added:
“The launch marks a feat for businesses and advocates of the unmanned delivery technology. So far AHA has reported a 60 percent reduction in drone delivery costs versus land and sea alternatives. It also claims to have reduced transportation time by up to 20 minutes during peak hours.”
 
The drone service of delivery in Iceland is under Icelandic Transport Authority’s “regulatory approval” and it has also claimed to “improve road safety”:
“The drones will reduce the load on the transport infrastructure leading to safer roads. Simultaneously people have access to a better and faster delivery service which can only be seen as an advantage.”
 
Nevertheless, considering the other side of the coin, “critics argue” that this new service heralding a new technology in operation “could be dangerous” besides intruding on “privacy and security” matters.
 
 
 
References:
www.cnbc.com







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