Daily Management Review

Donald Trump's trillion-dollar infrastructure plan is not going to work out


03/03/2017


A month before becoming president in 2009, Barack Obama promised to implement a fairly ambitious program for infrastructure renewal by reconstruction of roads and bridges of the USA, which also would create a large number of jobs.



Gage Skidmor
Gage Skidmor
Then, Obama suggested that ready-to-start projects would help in this process, but two years later he found what Donald Trump appears to learn soon: there is no such thing as projects ready to be implemented.

Speaking in the US Congress on 28 February, Donald Trump said he intends to draft a bill providing for allocation of $ 1 trillion investments to build roads, bridges, tunnels, airports and other infrastructure, which condition remains wanting. According to Trump, this project will involve millions of Americans.

Obama once recognized that implementation of such projects need to go through a number of bureaucratic procedures, which could take several years, sometimes even decades. As noted by William Ibbs, professor of construction management at the University of California at Berkeley and President of Ibbs Consulting Group, it took 23 years to replace a bridge in San Francisco damaged during an earthquake in 1989.

Large and important projects could not be implemented simply just because of the fact that they have received funding. There should be a long-term and well-developed forecast for their implementation, said Sarah Kline, a member of Bipartisan Policy Center in Washington.

Donald Trump gave no details of his plan for infrastructure renewal and how funding will be allocated. At the same time, Republicans and Democrats disagreed over the extent of federal spending. Majority Leader in the US Senate Mitch McConnell said he wanted to avoid incentives worth trillions of dollars.

However, Trump still wants to shorten time for approval of priority infrastructure projects in various instances which cannot be influenced by the federal government. Head of the White House even signed several orders in the first week after his inauguration to do this. However, experts believe that it is unlikely that the system will be changed fundamentally because of a large number of players involved in the process.

source: bloomberg.com






Science & Technology

Fast Company: Apple isn't the most innovative anymore

U.S. Space Program Could Be Delayed Due To SpaceX, Boeing Design Risks: Reuters

What trends will be affecting the health sector in the coming years?

Deloitte identifies main cyber threats for power industry

Zenuity To Take Self Driving Car Road Test In Sweden With Permission

Researchers: Half of Facebook users is fake

Amazon’s Ring gets in a privacy scandal

Facebook Is Creating A Stablecoin For Its WhatsApp Users

IBM offers to use the first quantum computer

Passport Numbers Of 5 Million Customers Hacked: Concedes Marriott

World Politics

World & Politics

AirHelp expects up to 33 th of cancellations and flight delays per day all over the world in 2019

Far-right and Catalonia: New elections in Spain

Trump is losing rating because of shutdown

Hanoi, Vietnam Chosen As Place For 2nd Summit Between Trump And Kim Jong-Un

US, China to hold new negotiations in Beijing

Human Rights Not To Be Dissociated From Stability, Macron Tells Sisi

Brexit Hijack Is Not The Parliament’s Right

Macedonia ignites political crisis in Greece