Daily Management Review

People Should See The Real Elon Musk, And Not The Twitter Blaster: Tech Analyst


07/22/2018




People Should See The Real Elon Musk, And Not The Twitter Blaster: Tech Analyst
According to a tech analyst, the tweets by Tesla chief Elon Musk detract from his mission.
 
The world needs to see the real Elon Musk.
 
"The public perception of Elon Musk more recently is he is thin-skinned and short-tempered," said tech analyst Gene Munster in an interview with the television news channel. An open letter that urged Musk to refrain from Twitter for the while was penned by Munster.
 
"That's not who Elon Musk is." Munster said. "It's important that the world sees what we think is the real Elon Musk."
 
Musk was described as a leader who is able to motivate followers and employees and has a wider crucial mission of hastening the adoption of cleaner and renewable energy by the world, according to Munster who is a managing partner with the venture capital firm Loup Ventures. While claiming that the open letter had been written by him on behalf of Tesla investors, Munster said that there was concern among investors that Musk could get detracted from his mission because of his Twitter outbursts.
 
"We heard from Tesla investors that something needed to be said," Munster explained.
 
This growing problem was described with a number of recent examples by Munster.
 
During an earnings call in May, analysts were attacked by the billionaire CEO. But he was fortunately sparred with short sellers and journalists on Twitter. An in the most recent incident, unfounded and disparaging comments were made against one Vernon Unsworth by Musk on twitter. Unsworth was in the team of rescuers engaged in a mission to save school children in a cave in Thailand. Munster said that the latest outburst crossed a line.
 
"Hopefully we'll see some changes over the months to come," he said.
 
Such controversies come at not a very good time for Tesla which has been finding it difficult to meet the production target for its Model 3, a car that is very crucial for the future of the company. Tesla has failed more than once on delivery deadlines as given by Musk because of bottlenecks in production and the company might soon require more investments to prevent a complete cash burnout.
 
In recent week, there has been a pick up in the cancellation of orders for Model 3m said Needham & Co. analyst Rajvindra Gill, earlier this week. tesla however does not agree to that statement.
 
According to some experts, the business might ultimately be hurt because of Musk's antics.
 
Brian Tierney, CEO of Brian Communications said that the Tesla leader is "not showing the kind of discipline of someone going to manufacture hundreds of thousands of cars."
 
"When you're looking to expand the appeal of your product beyond innovators themselves, beyond early adopters ... you've got to be careful," said Rebecca Lindland, an analyst with Kelly Blue Book. "You've got to start acting like a CEO."
 
(Source:www.money.cnn.com)






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