Daily Management Review

Record-Breaking $39 Million raised for Rare Cancer Research in 2018 by Cycle for Survival


04/02/2018




2017 was a very memorable year for Cycle for Survival – in fact it was described as a year that the organization managed to make history for itself. The organization or a movement that strives to fight rare cancers by raising money through its signature indoor team cycling events managed to raise $39 million in 2018.
 
Since the movement began back in 2007, it has bene able to raise a total of $180 million and in the last five years alone, the movement has managed to raise about $150 million, The proprietary rights to the movement lies with the Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center and it expends every dollar raised towards path breaking rare cancer research and clinical trials – of which the Center also plays a lead role.
 
The movement has been able to quadruple its funds since 2012 with active support from Equinox, sponsors and the participants form multiple passionate communities and donors.
 
In 2018, there were over 34,000 participants who rode cycles in the Cycle for Survival movement and included rare cancer survivors, patients, doctors, researchers, caregivers and supporters. Donations was received from more than 230,000 individuals for the cause. There are now over 950 corporate team participating in the event and therefore corporate donations has also increased. There are separate and dedicated events that are organized for the finance, media, professional services and real estate industries. This year, big names from the corporate world that joined the cause includes Smartwater, New Balance, TAG Heuer and ICAP.
 
Big names that participated in the event in 2018 included the names like actors David Schwimmer, Sterling K. Brown, Neil Patrick Harris, David Burtka, Dave Franco, Alison Brie, Joe Minoso, Randy Flagler and Kara Killmer; Alexander Rossi, professional racing driver and 2016 Indianapolis 500 Champion; Shannon Miller, seven-time Olympic medalist and Nastia Liukin, Olympic gold medalist.
 
The funds that are raised to distributed after appropriate allocation to multiple research projects – many of which have been able to change the manner of diagnosing and treating cancer. According to estimates, among those people who are suffering from cancer, about half of them are also suffering from a rare form of the disease. Such diseases can include cancers of the brain, ovarian, pancreatic, leukemia, lymphoma, all pediatric cancers and many others. There has typically been not enough funding for research in the area of rare cancer. There are often very few or no valid means of treatment for many patients suffering with rare cancer. In this context, urgently needed funding is provided by Cycle for Survival.
 
The funds gathered by Cycle for Survival are allocated for innovative clinical trials, research studies and major scientific initiatives. 
 
(Source:www.prnewswire.com)






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